backdoor protection

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By: Sophos     Published Date: Mar 30, 2017
Exploits are one of the main techniques used by cybercriminals to spread malware. They take advantage of weaknesses in legitimate software products like Flash and Microsoft Office to infect computers for their criminal ends. A single exploit can be used by myriad separate pieces of malware, all with different payloads. Read this paper to learn more about exploits and how to stop them. We’ll explore how exploits work, the exploit industry overall, what makes a good exploit in the eyes of the cybercriminals, and also how anti-exploit technology is a highly efficient and effective way to secure your organization against advanced and unknown threats.
Tags : malware, antivirus solutions, exploit protection, security software, exploit kits, software protection, backdoor protection
     Sophos
By: Sophos     Published Date: Mar 30, 2017
Many papers on the topic of advanced persistent threats (APTs) begin with ominous references to the changing threat landscape and stories of how highly sophisticated cyber attacks are becoming more prevalent. That can be misleading. The majority of attacks today still use many techniques that have been around for years—social engineering, phishing emails, backdoor exploits and drive-by downloads, to name the biggest ones. Such attacks are neither advanced nor particularly sophisticated when broken down into their individual components and often rely on the weakest link in any organization—the user. However, the way in which hackers use combinations of techniques and the persistent behavior of the attackers is something that does set APTs apart from other attempts to compromise security. This paper is designed to give you an overview of the common characteristics of APTs, how they typically work, and what kind of protection is available to help reduce the risk of an attack.
Tags : network security, firewall, data security, antivirus protection, email protection, virtual security, web protection, wireless protection, it security
     Sophos
By: McAfee     Published Date: Mar 31, 2017
The Adwind Remote Administration Tool is a backdoor Trojan written in Java language that targets various platforms that support Java files. Adwind does not exploit any vulnerabilities. In most cases, for an infection to succeed, the user must run the malware by double-clicking the .jar file that is usually distributed as an attachment, or opening an infected Microsoft Word document. The infection spreads if the Java Runtime Environment is installed on the user's computer. After the malicious .jar file is executed on the target system, the malware installs silently and connects to a remote server via a preconfigured port to receive commands from a remote attacker and perform other illegal operations.
Tags : backdoor trojans, trojan protection, malware, malware protection
     McAfee
By: McAfee     Published Date: Mar 31, 2017
The Adwind Remote Administration Tool is a backdoor Trojan written in Java language that targets various platforms that support Java files. Adwind does not exploit any vulnerabilities. In most cases, for an infection to succeed, the user must run the malware by double-clicking the .jar file that is usually distributed as an attachment, or opening an infected Microsoft Word document. The infection spreads if the Java Runtime Environment is installed on the user's computer. After the malicious .jar file is executed on the target system, the malware installs silently and connects to a remote server via a preconfigured port to receive commands from a remote attacker and perform other illegal operations.
Tags : backdoor trojans, trojan protection, malware, malware protection
     McAfee
By: McAfee     Published Date: Mar 31, 2017
The Adwind Remote Administration Tool is a backdoor Trojan written in Java language that targets various platforms that support Java files. Adwind does not exploit any vulnerabilities. In most cases, for an infection to succeed, the user must run the malware by double-clicking the .jar file that is usually distributed as an attachment, or opening an infected Microsoft Word document. The infection spreads if the Java Runtime Environment is installed on the user's computer. After the malicious .jar file is executed on the target system, the malware installs silently and connects to a remote server via a preconfigured port to receive commands from a remote attacker and perform other illegal operations.
Tags : backdoor trojans, trojan protection, malware, malware protection
     McAfee
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